The Voice of Louisville February Launch Party

On Jan. 31, The Voice hosted this month’s launch party at Louisville’s first and only champagne bar, The Champagnery. The massive crowd enjoyed reading through the new issue, snacking on tasty hors d’oeuvres and sipping on champagne. During the night’s giveaway, three lucky attendees took home exclusive merchandise, including a bucket purse from Architype Gallery, t-shirts from the Champagnery and a bottle of Biutiful Rosé.

Photos by Tim Valentino

The Speed Art Museum February Calendar

Photo by Tim Valentino.

The Speed is now open until 8 p.m. on Fridays and also hosts the monthly After Hours Party every third Friday until 10 p.m. More information can be found at speedmuseum.org.

Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour

1 to 2 p.m. Feb. 1

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.

 

Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour
1 to 2 p.m. Feb. 2

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.


Art Lab

1 to 4 p.m. Feb. 2

Visit Art Lab and enjoy an open art making studio where the only limitation is your own creativity! A variety of materials will be provided for you to use to make your vision a reality. Free with museum admission.

 

Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour
1 to 2 p.m. Feb. 3

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.


Speed Cinema
Hale County This Morning, This Evening

Directed by RaMell Ross

1 p.m. Feb. 3

 

Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour
2 to 3 p.m. Feb. 3

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.

Photo by Tim Valentino.

Family Drop-In Tour
3 to 4 p.m. Feb. 3

Explore the Speed’s collection on this interactive, hands-on tour designed for children and families. Best suited to children aged five to ten years. Free with admission.


Speed Cinema

“Rafiki”

Directed by Wanuri Kahiu

3 p.m. Feb. 3


Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour
1 to 2 p.m. Feb. 6

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.


Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour
1 to 2 p.m. Feb. 7

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.


Speed Cinema Special Screenings

hillbilly

Directed by Sally Rubin and Ashley York

6 p.m. Feb. 7

 

Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour
1 to 2 p.m. Feb. 8

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.


Speed Cinema
2019 Oscar Nominated Short Films

6 p.m. Feb. 8,  Animated

1 p.m. Feb. 9, Live Action

3 p.m. Feb. 9,  Animated

6 p.m. Feb. 9, Documentary, Part 1

3 p.mFeb. 10,  Animated

6 p.m. Feb. 15,  Live Action

3 p.m. Feb. 16,  Live Action

6 p.m. Feb. 16,  Documentary, Part 2

3 p.m. Feb. 17,  Animated

 

Adult Workshops: Back to Basics: Pet Portraits
10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Feb. 9

Join the Speed this month to celebrate your favorite family member… your pet! Bring in a reference photo and they will work to capture the spirit of your pet through illustration techniques. All materials will be provided. Ages 16 and up. $10 for members / $20 for non-members.

 

Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour
1 to 2 p.m. Feb. 9

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.

 

Blanchard/McMurray Clock. Courtesy of the Speed Art Museum.

Youth Side-by-Side Workshop: Clock Creations
1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Feb. 9

Learn about the history of time keeping and how it intersects with family heirlooms and memory on a guided tour of Making Time: The Art of the Kentucky Tall Case Clock. Using these ideas, you’ll create your own clock decorated with a personalized design. Ages 6-12 years. A parent or guardian must also register for the workshop. $5 for members/ $10 for non-members.


Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour
1 to 2 p.m. Feb. 10

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.


Art Lab
1 to 4 p.m. Feb. 10

Visit Art Lab and enjoy an open art making studio where the only limitation is your own creativity! A variety of materials will be provided for you to use to make your vision a reality. Free with museum admission.


Speed Cinema – Owsley Free Sundays

Appalshop at 50

Evelyn Williams

Directed by Anne Lewis

1:30 p.m. Feb. 10

Free


Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour
2 to 3 p.m. Feb. 10

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.

 

Preschool Drop-In Tour: Texture Tour
2:15 to 3 p.m. Feb. 10

Enjoy this tactile tour that gives young learners an appropriate way to explore the museum environment through their sense of touch. Using a variety of props, this tour will help children match, sort and describe textures in artworks while developing their vocabulary. Bring your preschooler (ages 3-5) to the Speed Art Museum for a fun and educational tour designed specifically for early learners! A variety of different tours are available to appeal to your little one’s interests.

 

Family Drop-In Tour
3 to 4 p.m. Feb. 10

Explore the Speed’s collection on this interactive, hands-on tour designed for children and families. Best suited to children aged five to ten years. Free with admission.


Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour
1 to 2 p.m. Feb. 13

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.

Photo by Bill Wine.


Speed Cinema

Harlan Jacobson’s Talk Cinema

All is True

Directed by Kenneth Branagh

7 p.m. Feb. 13



Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour
1 to 2 p.m. Feb. 14

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.

 

After Hours at the Speed
5 to 10 p.m. Feb. 15

Photo by Kathryn Harrington.

Evening hours are back at the Speed! On the third Friday of each month, the Museum will be open until 10 p.m. Each After Hours event comes alive with an eclectic mix of music, performances, cash bar + food available by Wiltshire at the Speed, and of course art! Come experience the Speed after hours like you’ve never experienced it before.  February’s exciting events include:

5 to 7 p.m: Family Programming Activity! Education Court

5 to 10 p.m.: Awards season means it’s time for the Speedies! Explore the collection and decide who the night’s big winners will be with this Oscar-themed self-guided tour. Galleries

5:30 p.m.: Play matchmaker with art as you learn about the permanent collection with a Speed Dating Tour from Director of Education, Shannon Karol Meet in Gallery 1

6 to 9 p.m.: Strike a pose and capture the night with a Derby City Selfie Booth Grand Hall

6 to 8 p.m.: Learn one of the world’s most romantic dances with a performance and lessons from the Louisville Tango Society. Atrium

6:30 to 8 p.m.: Join Louisville’s premiere live karaoke group, Full Contact Karaoke, and serenade a loved one… or even a NOT-so-loved one. SIGN UP for your song slot now! Grand Hall

6 and 8 p.m.: Screening of the Oscar Nominated Live Action Short Films (tickets sold separately) Cinema

7 p.m.: Pianist Joey Thieman will perform love songs to serenade your strolls through the galleries. 1927 Grand Staircase

8 p.m: Play matchmaker with art as you learn about the permanent collection with a Speed Dating Tour from Director of Education, Shannon Karol Meet in Gallery 1

8:30 to 10 p.m.: Join Louisville, premiere live karaoke group, Full Contact Karaoke, and serenade a loved one… or even a NOT-so-loved one. SIGN UP for your song slot now! Grand Hall

9 p.m.: Pianist Joey Thieman and his accompanying Chamber Group will perform love songs to serenade your strolls through the galleries. 1927 Grand Staircase

– A special menu designed for After Hours by Wiltshire at the Speed

– Specialty cocktails from Early Times Whiskey

 

Youth Side-by-Side Workshop: Clock Creations
10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Feb. 15

Clock Creations Learn about the history of time keeping and how it intersects with family heirlooms and memory on a guided tour of Making Time: The Art of the Kentucky Tall Case Clock. Using these ideas, you’ll create your own clock decorated with a personalized design. Ages 6-12 years. A parent or guardian must also register for the workshop. $5 for members/$10 for non-members. 

 

Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour
1 to 2 p.m. Feb. 15

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.


Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour
Feb. 16 at 1 to 2 p.m.

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.


Speed Cinema – Exhibition on Screen

Young Picasso

Directed by Phil Grabsky

1 p.m. Feb. 16

5 p.m. Feb. 17


Photo by Tim Valentino.


Speed Cinema – Owsley Free Sunday

French Film Festival

Maigret and the St. Fiacre Case (Maigret et l’affaire Saint-Fiacre)

Directed by Jean Delannoy

12:30 p.m. Feb. 17

Free


Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour
1 to 2 p.m. Feb. 17

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.


Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour
2 to 3 p.m. Feb. 17

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.

 

Family Drop-In Tour
3 to 4 p.m.  Feb. 17

Explore the Speed’s collection on this interactive, hands-on tour designed for children and families. Best suited to children aged five to ten years. Free with admission.

 

Patron Circle Coffee with a Curator: African Galleries with Kim Spence
10 to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 20

Patron Circle members are invited to join Kim Spence, Curator of Prints, Drawings and Photography, for coffee followed by a curator-led tour of African Art. Space is limited and restricted to Patron Circle and International Benefactor Circle Members. For more information on the talk, or joining Patron Circle,


Speed Cinema
2019 Louisville Jewish Film Festival

The Cakemaker

Directed by Ofir Raul Grazier

1 p.m. and 7 p.m.  Feb. 21


Speed Cinema
What is Democracy?

Directed by Astra Taylor

6 p.m. Feb. 22

3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Feb. 23

3 p.m. Feb. 24

 

Speed Cinema – Owsley Free Sunday

French Film Festival and the Louisville Children’s Film Festival

The Big Bad Fox & Other Tales (Le Grand Méchant Renard et Autres Contes)

Directed by Benjamin Renner and Patrick Imbert

1 p.m. Feb. 23 – Dubbed in English

1 p.m. Feb. 24 – In French with English subtitles

Free


Family Drop-In Tour
3 to 4 p.m.  Feb. 24

Explore the Speed’s collection on this interactive, hands-on tour designed for children and families. Best suited to children aged five to ten years. Free with admission.

 

General Membership Talk with Kim Spence on the Renovated African Galleries
1:30 to 2:30 p.m. Feb. 27

Members are invited to talk with Curator of Prints, Drawings and Photography Kim Spence about the updated African Galleries. Space is limited and restricted to Members of the Speed. For more information on the talk, or becoming a Member, please contact LaShana Avery at 502.634.2719.

 

Collection Highlights Drop-in Tour
1 to 2 p.m. Feb. 28 at

Explore the Speed and engage in conversations during this one-hour Docent-guided tour focused on the highlights of our collection. Free with admission. For more information, visit our tours page.

 

70 Years of Arts Celebration

Fund for the Arts celebrated their 70-year legacy with a night of entertainment at the Brown Theatre on Jan. 29. Arts supporters, board members, community leaders, volunteers and donors gathered together to see performances by several artists and arts organizations from around Louisville. The event was emceed by The Voice’s own Angie Fenton and attended by more than 700 guests.

Photos by Kathryn Harrington

AHA! Moments & Creative Placehealing

On Jan. 25, corporate leaders, organization and community members came together for a dynamic evening at UofL’s Kosair Charities Clinical Translational Research Building. Performances included a preview of the the Louisville Ballet’s Choreographers’ Showcase, a performance by musician Teddy Abrams and poetry by Hannah Drake and Theo Edmonds. This event was led by Humana, the Louisville Health Advisory Board (LHAB), IDEAS xLab, University of Louisville School of Public Health & Information Sciences and the Muhammad Ali Center.

Photos by Andrea Hutchinson

Arms of Love

A conversation with Dominique “Joy” Thompson

By Janice Carter Levitch

Photos by Joe Goodwin

Dominique “Joy” Thompson has one of the most unique looks I have ever encountered. She reminds me of Iman and Grace Jones blended together to create the perfect supermodel. The words gorgeous, tall, slender and absolutely mesmerizing describe her physical beauty, but it is more than skin deep. The wife and mother of three strives to encourage others and demonstrate that all things are possible if you just believe.

 Working full time as a certified nursing assistant at University of Louisville Hospital, Joy finds great fulfillment in helping nurse people back to health. However, her calling is feeding the homeless and making care packages for people in hospitals and nursing homes. Arms of Love is a program that she created to help those in need.

I was thrilled when Joy accepted my request for a sit-down for The Voice. 

Janice: You have an amazing look. Can you tell me about the choice to keep your head shaved?

Joy: I’ve struggled with hair issues pretty much all my life. It falls out a lot and my hairline is receding. It’s very thin and patchy. When it does grow, two inches is pretty much my max. The last time my hair fell out, I hid behind hats and stayed home even from church. I came out one day with a black wrap on and it was sliding off. As embarrassed and ashamed as I was, I decided to reveal my truth and testify about my hair. It was the moment of transparency, and I became free and unashamed to be the real me. Accepting what I consider “my thorn” taught me that true beauty is found from within and being bald just accesses it much easier.


“Accepting what I consider ‘my thorn’ taught me that true beauty is found from within and being bald just accesses it much easier.”

– Dominique “Joy” Thompson

How did you choose your modeling career path?

I didn’t choose modeling; modeling chose me. I was the first model for the Louisville Metro Healthy Start Campaign when it debuted over 15 years ago. My daughter was a baby and they needed a model, but I had no babysitter (during) their launching brunch. I was invited to attend and was offered my first modeling job featuring my daughter. We were the first models ever chosen for that campaign. Our images were seen throughout the city on transit buses, on brochures, in hospitals, clinics and the city’s family health and wellness programs. I’ve done modeling here and there from time to time.

I’m an encourager at heart and a true prayer warrior.”

 Modeling met me again after I lost my hair about six years ago. Someone needed a picture of me to put on a church flyer because I was chosen as one of the guest singers, and I had no professional pictures. Shanetta Thompson is my sister-in-law and she told me about Joe Goodwin, one of Louisville’s best photographers. She thought we would work magic together. Joe said he’s always wanted to do a shoot with me, so I had my first photo shoot with Joe, and we’ve been working magic ever since. He’s my favorite photographer and has been very instrumental in my modeling career. His images along with a few more of my faves – Tony Welscher, Erik Branch, Albert Jones, Ty Daniels, Clay Cook, Steve Squall, Genna Yussman Greene and Derek Hibben – are all photographers in the city of Louisville. Their images, along with my agent Kathy Campbell of Heyman Talent Agency, are very instrumental in helping me further advance in my modeling career. 

I’ve modeled for Macy’s Kentucky Fashion Show, New York Fashion Week, ABC’s “The View,” Runway Liberia International and Fashion Week in several cities including Columbus, Cincinnati, Indiana and Atlanta. (Locally,) I’ve also modeled for All is Fair in Love & Fashion, Ann-DeEvelyn Co., Wine Women & Shoes and many more.

Where do you draw inspiration for your wardrobe choices?

I’m pretty spontaneous when it comes to my wardrobe. I love fashion and being creative. Two of my favorite styles are trendy fashion and elegant formal wear.

Are there certain colors you are drawn to?

My favorite color is red. It’s the love, passion and fierce color. You can never go wrong with red. I also love mustard yellow and anything black or white. Green captures my attention, too.

What inspires you when you’re in a photo shoot?

I find inspiration from several things, including posing and movement, knowing how and when to coordinate facial expressions and body movement. This is something I’m always trying to improve on as a model. I love having a team that includes a creative director, stylist and makeup artist, (though) a lot of times I apply my own makeup. I love listening to gospel, classical and jazz music during a shoot because it helps me to embody the mood of the garments I’m wearing.   

How would you describe your personality?

I’m pretty fun and bubbly. My middle name is Joy, and I’m told I embody this emotion a lot. I love people. I’m an introvert with an extroverted twist. I’m a very private person but very friendly, too. You’ll definitely find me complimenting and hugging everyone in the room. I’m an encourager at heart and a true prayer warrior. Everyone that knows me knows before I became a model, I have always been a church girl first.

Can you describe your personal style?

My personal style is laid-back and comfortable. When I’m not modeling or at work, I’m happy wearing leggings and plaid shirts. I love sweaters and jackets. I’m cold a lot so at night I can be found wearing a Snuggy, soft warm cushion socks and (I’ll) have my pet Chihuahua nearby.


Modeling taught me to love myself, bold and beautiful, with or without makeup, bald and free.”

Who is your biggest fashion influencer?

I don’t really have one at the moment. I love seeing differentiations of fashion and how it’s evolving.

 Do friends seek wardrobe advice from you?

Sometimes they’ll ask my opinion of what goes with what or if I think something looks good.

What was your “aha moment” when you knew you were unique?

I took a step of faith and auditioned at Heyman Talent Agency. I thought I wouldn’t be accepted because I’m bald. But the staff said, “Girl, have you seen a mirror? We want to represent you. You are beautiful. We love your look. It’s unique.” For years, I couldn’t even accept my own flaws and for the first time something I least expected happened – the agency accepted me just as I am. Modeling taught me to love myself, bold and beautiful, with or without makeup, bald and free. V

Joy hopes to transition Arms of Love from a personal mission into a nonprofit organization this year. To learn more, send an email to so_joyful@yahoo.com.

Symbol  of Strength

By Janice Carter Levitch

Photos by Kory Johnson

The lion is a symbol of both courage and strength. When the homeowners of 11303 Yandell Drive decided to build this dream home, they knew it would be ensconced with the majestic air of a lion and would symbolize their belief in the strength of family. Four bedrooms, five full bathrooms and two partial baths nestled on five acres make this home desirable, with what most people would consider a dream design.

Nestled in the bucolic neighborhood of Nutwood, the approach to this mansion is nothing short of grand. The circular motor court allows for the easy flow of arriving guests and is anchored with a water fountain reminiscent of those found in ancient European villas. Built by Karzen Langan, the home features divine symmetry throughout, and every chandelier is custom made. Libby Rush from Bittners worked with the homeowners when making the selections for the interior design elements. The home is welcoming – but on a grand scale.

The property is currently listed at $3,300,000 with Lenihan Sotheby’s International Realty Agent Crystalyn Noland. At more than 14,000 square feet, the residence contains modern amenities with an old-world design. Large columns grace the front entry, almost as if announcing the elegance that waits to be seen just beyond the front doors. The chandelier in the foyer marks a dramatic entry to the show-stopping home. Designed for lavish entertaining, this grand space can host large soirees or small family gatherings. In the center of the entryway, directly above the intricate inlay in the floor, is a circular opening lined with a custom-designed wrought iron railing accentuated with a hand-stretched wooden handrail, offering an amazing line of light. Nearby, a bar that instantly transports you to another place and time is done is such a way to add a subtle masculine tone. The main spiral staircase is highlighted by a runner that goes up every step. Each color of the thread was hand selected by the homeowners to create a one-of-a-kind rug that perfectly suits the interior.

Inspiration was gathered from the many travels the homeowners have experienced. Those design features brought a personal touch to the overall feeling of the home. The lion designs appear throughout the home, signifying the strength of family.

Travertine columns in Roman Doric design, reminiscent of Saint Peter’s Basilica, mark the entry to the great room, where the ceiling reaches a soaring height of 22 feet. A hand-painted Venetian mural depicting a scene from the homeowners’ honeymoon blends seamlessly with the view of the outdoor landscape just beyond the windows. Creating a symphonic feel, the ceiling molding was designed to mimic the shape of the swimming pool. Elegantly transitioning to the kitchen, a second family room and an octagon-shaped informal dining space provide an abundance of natural light and views of nature. The kitchen is the heart of the home and includes many custom features such as Viking Range, bespoke cabinetry and granite countertops.

The office has a coffered ceiling, mahogany wood paneling, a stunning fireplace and other custom features, leaving no detail unattended. The shelving and cabinets create a luxurious atmosphere. Beyond the office is the master suite that includes a beautiful sitting room that allows an abundance of natural light to flood the room. “This master suite offers a true feeling of a peaceful retreat,” Noland commented. “The master bath was designed to allow views of the private landscape that seems to stretch on forever.”

With a spacious dining room designed for entertaining, an easy flow is provided from the kitchen through the butler’s pantry. The overall design of the home is traditional, but certain unique designs crown the home with simple but significant modern details.

Three bedrooms on the second level, which has an additional laundry room, include ensuite bathrooms for each. One of the bedrooms includes a secret room, adding to the spectacular character of the home.

Family friendly, the lower level boasts a theater room along with a bonus area that was designed specifically for the children to have friends over for slumber parties. A fitness room with state-of-the-art equipment can also be found in the lower level.

 “There has been so much investment made for many things you don’t see in this home but really make the home strong,” Noland added. “Outside, the pool is surrounded by a large terrace and pool house with an area to barbecue and enjoy the great outdoors.”

Tennis courts, basketball courts and five acres of privacy in Anchorage make this home a true gem. Perfection is the best word to describe this home. Every detail is well planned with parents and children in mind, resulting in a home that reflects the strength and love of family. V

Toys for Tots

The annual Toys for Tots party, sponsored by the Marine Corps Reserve, was held on Dec. 15, at the Omni Hotel in downtown Louisville.

Photos by John H. Harralson Jr.


John H. Harralson Jr. is a veteran photographer and iconic figure in Louisville society. He owned and published The Voice from 1987 through 2005. At the age of 91, Mr. Harralson still regularly contributes to the magazine and can often be seen photographing local parties, galas and sporting events. 

The Family Business

L to R: Dave Parks with his mother Pat, who previously owned the business; sister Stacey, who owns Multiple Option Mortgage Services; and sister Judie Parks, who co-owns Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Parks & Weisberg Realtors.

Dave Parks and his sister Judie Parks co-own Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Parks & Weisberg Realtors, the firm their mother once owned. Therein lie some interesting stories about life, opportunity, decisions, responsibilities and relationships.

 

By Steve Kaufman

Photos by Kathryn Harrington

The name on the company stationery is Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Parks & Weisberg Realtors. “It’s the longest name in real estate,” joked co-owner Dave Parks.

And if that were the only thing to distinguish this realty and property management firm in that highly competitive business, it might make for some good conversation at industry functions.

But this is also a 65-year-old Louisville institution that has grown exponentially since Dave and his sister, Judie Parks, bought it 10 years ago.

“We’ve expanded our property management business by 100 percent,” said Dave, “and grown our agent base by 100 percent.”

The successes and growth have not gone unnoticed. Dave was named 2018 Realtor of the Year by the Greater Louisville Association of Realtors (GLAR). Judie Parks won the award in 2016.

The firm’s reputation is so strong that when a real estate company was going to exit the Louisville market, the owners came to Dave and said, “We admire what you do. We’d like you to be our new company.”

“They gave us their book of business,” he recalled.

A staff meeting at Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Parks & Weisberg Realtors.

His mother, Pat Parks, became an owner of the then-36-year-old company in 1988 – joining Frank and Ron Weisberg in what became Parks & Weisberg, a Prudential Financial franchisee. “She became nationally known for her agent-training programs,” said Dave, and she was the first president from this area elected to the National Women’s Council of Realtors.

“She still comes into the office regularly to do coaching and mentoring,” Dave said of his mother.

When Prudential was getting out of the real estate business and cutting loose its franchisees, it convinced Warren Buffet to get Berkshire Hathaway, his multinational conglomerate, into residential real estate franchising. Parks & Weisberg was one of the first companies invited to be part of that.

Marine Life

Despite his family background in the business – in addition to his mother, his father was a builder and property manager – and that he managed a 40-unit apartment complex when he was 19, Dave didn’t set his course for real estate. After graduating from St. Xavier High School in 1980, he joined the Marine Corps, which sent him to Ohio State University for a degree in business.

But Dave also spent a third of his military career in recruiting command, “so I learned how to train salespeople and to run a sales organization. With the combination of military experience and leadership experience, it was a natural thing for me to use that skill set in the real estate business after I retired from the Corps in 2001.”

‘No’ to P&G, ‘Yes’ to Louisville

Dave’s first instinct was to try joining Procter & Gamble’s brand management program at the company’s Cincinnati headquarters. But on the very brink of that interview, he had lunch with a senior partner at Procter.

“He told me, ‘You’re about to get this job if you want it. But you’re 39, you spent 20 years in the Marines, you know how to lead people. Wouldn’t you rather be in business for yourself?’”

The answer, it turned out, was “yes,” and Dave was soon on I-71 South back to Louisville – with his wife Jennie and daughters Kate (then 3-and-a-half) and Jessica (then 6 months old) – “to learn the real estate business from the ground up.”

Dave Parks with his mother, Pat.

Hello, Mother

Learn, he did. He joined his mother’s firm and went to work. “Like most new real estate agents, I went out knocking on doors, prospecting, holding open houses,” he recalled. “I’ve closed more than 1,000 homes since 2001 and I’ve sold about $200 million worth of real estate in all the various sectors of the business – residential, commercial, rental.”

Since buying the company outright in 2008, Judie and Dave have also expanded their lines of business. “We own some investment properties and manage about 1,000 doors in the city – of which about 250 are single-family, and the balance are multi-family and homeowners’ association doors [condominiums, subdivisions]. We do business with rental properties, owned properties and some commercial properties, mainly in the three counties in Southern Indiana [Clark, Floyd and Harrison] and the three Kentucky counties [Jefferson, Oldham and Bullitt] that constitute the Louisville Greater Metropolitan Area.”

The Better You

But Dave eventually decided his most valuable day-to-day role would be about the training and grooming of people: “the skill set I mastered in the Marines.”

He explained that doubling the firm’s agent base and improving its performance has been one of the major keys to growth.

“Our business model is that we are a human development company in the business of helping people grow as humans,” he said. “Our basic philosophy is that we try to make you better with us than you’d be without us.”

Also, he said, “Because of the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices franchise system, we now have a lot of back-end tools that make it more efficient for agents to grow their sales skills, prospecting skills and ability to follow up with their clients.”

That was one of the reasons the Parks siblings jumped at the chance to affiliate with Irvine, California-based Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices.

Sister Act

While Dave has focused on training, mentoring and operations, Judie has become the principal broker of the firm. The Speed School graduate and former computer engineer for Ford Motor Company also heads corporate relocation and referral services for the office.

“She’s the rock upon which we establish our values as a team,” said her brother.

Both of them have won Berkshire Hathaway HomeService’s Legend Award, two of only three Kentuckians to have everwon it.

The Market

The firm is operating in a strong rental market. As bad as the homeowners’ market was in the recessionary years, 2008 through 2011, it resulted in people having to sell their homes at a loss to keep from going more deeply underwater, or losing their homes altogether, or renting them out just to keep the mortgages paid for.

 “Roughly 3,000 homes were lost or abandoned in this city,” Dave said. “Those people had to live somewhere, so they became renters. And the rental market across the United States, but especially here, became very strong.”

The recession also had another effect on the rental market. The older of the millennials were coming out of college as the recession hit, had trouble finding good jobs and were renting rather than buying homes – or living with their parents.

“They also often grew up with their houses in jeopardy or actually lost,” said Dave, “so they didn’t associate the safety net that homes traditionally have had. Even if they could afford to buy, they weren’t culturally inclined to do it.”

And, of course, mortgage lending tightened up in those recessionary years and funding for condominium development dried up. “It became a supply-and-demand proposition,” said Dave. “Right now, the demand for rentals is tremendously high in areas like Germantown, the Highlands and St. Matthews. In these high-demand areas, if a rental house hits the market, it’s likely to go in a matter of days. And the prices are higher there.

“We even have rental properties in Glenview,” he said. “And Norton Commons has become one of the most expensive places to rent in Jefferson County.”

Dave Parks.

Parks and Recreation

Dave, who still believes that real estate is the best, safest and most reliable wealth-building vehicle there is – even despite the short-term effects of the recession – lives in the Lime Kiln Road area with his wife and daughters.

Kate, graduated from Assumption High School and is now a junior at the University of Kentucky studying business and accounting. Jessica is currently at Assumption with plans to attend UK and study business.

So the family bleeds blue? “Yes,” said Dave, “but we’re also season ticket-holders at Louisville’s football and men’s and women’s basketball, so we’re all in for the whole state.”

Parks met Jenny through mutual friends when the Marine was home from Japan one summer in the mid-80s. They spent about two hours together, he related, and then he went back to Japan for a year.

“I came home the following summer and we were engaged 28 days later,” he recalled. “That was 32 years ago. I know a good thing when I find it.”

Which is a good business plan as well. V

Business Briefs

2019 Building Industry Association Board of Directors Installed

A Louisville custom home builder and Registered Builder has been inducted as the 2019 President of the Board of the Building Industry Association of Greater Louisville (BIA).

Scott Welch.

 Scott Welch, president of Welch Builders, Inc., was elected president for the 2019 term. He succeeds Mark Simpson, president of Simpson Builders, Inc.

Scott and his father, Robert “Bob” Welch, founded Welch Builders in 1985, which prides itself on timeless elegance, extraordinary communication between client and builder and personal involvement in every detail of a Welch-built home.

The 2019 Vice President and 2020 President-Elect is Don Wirtzberger, owner of Sierra Design & Construction.

Welch and Wirtzberger will serve on the BIA’s executive committee. Other executive officers are as follows:

Treasurer
Karen McKechnie, Stonehenge Construction LLC & Sons

Secretary
Tom Waller, Signature Crafted Homes

Associate Vice President
Joe Simms, RE/MAX Associates-Joe Simms Group

Immediate Past President
Mark Simpson, Simpson Builders

Executive Vice President
Juva Barber, Building Industry Association of Greater Louisville

President’s Advisor
Billy Doelker, Key Homes

Associate Advisor
Tom Raver, Fireplace Distributors

The Building Industry Association of Greater Louisville is the second largest association of its kind in the country, representing more than 2,100 member companies, corporations and individuals involved in the residential and commercial construction, remodeling and home improvement industries.


Two Norton Commons Businesses Set to Expand

Representatives from Draped in Style and Set the Stage are excited to expand. Photo courtesy of Norton Commons.

Norton Commons, the growing and walkable urbanist development in Prospect, Kentucky, has announced the groundbreaking on a new mixed-use, live/work project on the last remaining South Village Town Center parcels at Meeting St. and Norton Commons Blvd. The project will include retail and restaurant spaces occupying the ground floors with companion townhomes on the second and third floors.

Set the Stage Interior Design and Home Décor, currently located in Norton Commons at 10515 Meeting St. #101, will be making a move to the new space and expanding to a commercial space of approximately 2,200 square feet. “Our home accessories, décor and furniture business has really taken off in less than two years here in Norton Commons,” said Set the Stage Owner Karista Hannah. “We think it’s a tribute to our unique products and customer service, as well as Norton Commons emerging as a go-to boutique, restaurant and services destination.”

In addition, Draped in Style, a residential and commercial window coverings business selling draperies, blinds and shades will move from 9412 Norton Commons Blvd. to occupy approximately 3,300 square feet of commercial space. “This new space is going to allow us to expand our inventory and showroom,” said Marybeth Crouch, who co-owns Draped in Style along with her daughter, Vanessa Crouch Yates.

Both shops will continue to operate in their original locations for the time being but hope to move by late summer or early fall of 2019.

Norton Commons has four additional lots for sale in the South Village Town Center, including a 48×100 lot suited for a restaurant.


Elite Homes Opens Sales Office for Exquisite Homes in New Twin Lakes at Floyds Fork Community

Elite Homes, one of Kentucky’s preeminent builders, announces that the sales office is now open for its newest Louisville community, Twin Lakes at Floyds Fork. Located on Aiken Road, just minutes away from top local schools and shopping, the homes are being built along tree-lined streets with beautifully landscaped common areas featuring two lakes. Twin Lakes also offers convenient access to the Gene Snyder Freeway.

“We’re opening this community with our Patriotic Series of homes, which are designed for homebuyers who are looking to move up to bigger houses with luxury standard features,” said Michael Metzkes, chief operating officer of Elite Homes. “In the future, we will offer additional sections with our luxury Garden Homes for the empty nester looking to right-size their life here in Louisville.”

The Patriotic Series includes one- and two-story homes and models ranging from three bedrooms and two baths to five bedrooms and three and a half baths (1,960 square feet to 3,099 square feet). Standard features include Pella windows, four-sided brick elevations, hardwood floors and kitchens that include cabinets with 42” uppers, crown molding, granite countertops and more. Grand opening prices will be between $353,900 and $433,900.

For more information and a virtual tour of the models and design center, please visit www.LiveTwinLakes.com.


To submit your business brief, email circulation@redpinmedia.com

 

Becoming

Becoming


Photographer: Andrea Hutchinson

Stylist: Liz Bingham

Hair & Makeup: Joseph’s Salon & Spa

Model: Sue Davidson, Heyman Talent

All styles available at Rodes For Her


Lafayette 148 New York blouse, $348; Jane Post NYC jacket, $475; Cindy Borders earrings, $88; Loeffler Randall leopard print sneakers, $325; Krewe tortoise sunglasses, $215.


Chiara Boni top, $395; Margo Morrison baroque pearl and Swarovski necklace, $995; Margo Morrison pearl earrings, $450. Sunglasses from stylist’s personal collection.


Marisa Baratelli silk blouse, $625; Connie Roberson silk pants, $275; Mitch fur gloves, $75; BaubleBar earrings, $48.


Lafayette 148 New York blouse with bell sleeves, $448; W. Kleinberg calf hair belt, $240; Simon Sebbag silver earrings, $120.

Marisa Baratelli silk blouse, $625; Connie Roberson silk pants, $275; BaubleBar earrings, $48; Emy Mack pony zebra flats, $285.

State of the Art

Inspired by performances, positives, shapes and ships


RICHARD GALLO: PERFORMANCE AND STUDIO 1968–1980

The University of Louisville’s Hite Art Institute presents a new photography exhibition dedicated to exploring the life and work of performance artist Richard Gallo through Feb. 23. Also known as Lemon Boy, Gallo often dressed provocatively and performed in New York City. He’s credited with inspiring many prominent artists of his day, including Andy Warhol. The exhibition highlights images from Gallo’s archive, some of which had never been presented to the public.


GUANO APASIONADO: WORKS BY RYAN CASE

 

The Gallery at Art Sanctuary is hosting a new solo exhibition titled, “Guano Apasionado: Works by Ryan Case.” The Louisville-based artist makes color and expression his priority. His style, following an abstract look at pop-art portraiture, is unique and reflects his values of positive thinking. The show opens Feb. 1, with a reception following, and runs through Feb. 23.


CLAY BODIES: MOVING THROUGH CERAMICS

 

Sarah Crowner’s “Clay Bodies” is on display in the second floor gallery of KMAC Museum through April 7. With a mix of clay and ceramic samples, the exhibition gives the viewer a look into the mind of the painter and her relationship with material. “With this installation, I tried to disregard the distinction between art and artifact and the so-called hierarchy between art and craft,” Crowner said.


SHANTYBOATING

 

Until March 29, you can witness Angie Reed Garner’s “Shantyboating” at Garner Narrative. The artist was inspired  “Kentucky’s Thoreau,” Harlan Hubbard. “[His] determination to make his own way, choosing his terms and accepting their consequences did not depend on anything like having a boat, but a marriage of necessity and creativity,” Reed Garner said. “…As for me, I would have to go shantyboating without a river or a boat; I’d dock myself wherever I could find a welcome or tolerance anyway, sell and live off the art I made, however humbly.”